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Short Course Descriptions and Instructors

2018 ESL Short Courses include one full-day and 11 half-day courses. 

Click here to download the 2018 Short Courses brochure.


Adaptive Antennas for GNSS Receivers

Instructor: Inder “Jiti” Gupta, Professor Emeritus

Duration: Half-day

Date/Time: Wednesday, August 8  |  8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

GNSS receivers are vulnerable to radio frequency interference. One can use signal processing techniques to suppress interference. However, the signal processing techniques are limited to narrowband interfering signals. Spatial processing using adaptive antenna, therefore, has become the universal choice for suppression of radio frequency interference in GNSS receivers. Learn more about the various parameters that affect the performance, C/N and antenna induced biases in GNSS receiver measurements, of GNSS adaptive antennas.


Atmospheric Electromagnetic Propagation

Instructor: Caglar Yardim, Research Assistant Professor

Duration: Half-day

Date/Time: Wednesday, August 8  |  8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Atmospheric conditions strongly influence the EM links between the transmitter and receiver in communications systems or radar and target in a radar application. Receive an overview of electromagnetic principles for all communication and radar systems operating in the atmosphere using propagation mechanisms such as line-of-sight, ground wave, tropospheric, ionospheric, satellite-to-earth, nonstandard atmospheric propagation.


Anechoic Chamber Design for Direct Antenna Measurements

Instructor: Teh-Hong Lee, Research Scientist

Duration: Half-day

Date/Time: Wednesday, August 8  |  1:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Learn about design aspects of indoor anechoic chambers, including tapered, rectangular and compact range, for direct antenna measurement applications. The chamber design typically is dictated by the frequency and the size of the antennas under test. These factors ultimately determine the type of chamber and its size. In addition, learn more about the design concept of a compact range, the absorber layout for these chambers, as well as the method to evaluate the chamber performance.


Understanding Passive Radar: From Fundamental Theory to Advanced Applications

Instructor: Graeme E. Smith, Research Assistant Professor

Duration: Half-day

Date/Time: Wednesday, August 8  |  1:30 PM - 5:00 PM

With rising demand on the electromagnetic spectrum to support communications, passive radar methods are critical for future remote sensing capabilities. Learn about passive radar through work examples, including experimental results. Included topics cover: passive radar fundamentals; GNSS reflectometry; target imaging; and multistatic, array based localization and tracking.


Body Area Sensing: from E-Textiles to Wireless Implants

Instructor: Asimina Kiourti, Assistant Professor

Duration: Half-day

Date/Time: Thursday, August 9  |  8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Rapid advances in wireless communications, sensing technologies, and materials are opening new and unexplored opportunities in body area sensing, including next-generation wearables and implants that can unobtrusively provide round-the-clock health status information. Example applications include clinical, sports, military, consumer electronics, etc. Discover technologies that make body area sensing a reality, including antenna design, powering, flexible materials, and more.


Chip-Scale Nonlinear Integrated Photonics

Instructor: Ronald M. Reano, Professor

Duration: Half-day

Date/Time: Wednesday, August 9  |  1:30 PM - 5:00 PM

The integrated photonics concept is the application of thin-film technology to optical circuits and devices for the purpose of achieving high-performance optical systems with advantages in miniaturization, mechanical stability, and economies of scale. On the chip-scale, optical waveguides can exhibit high electric field intensities at low absolute power levels, resulting in efficient nonlinear optical devices. This short course introduces the fundamentals of nonlinear optics in planar optical waveguides designed to exploit fundamental nonlinear optical effects. 


RF Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems and Devices

Instructor: Nima Ghalichechian, Assistant Professor

Duration: Full-day

Date/Time: Thursday, August 9  |  8:30 AM - 5:00 PM

The field of radio frequency micro-electro-mechanical systems (RF MEMS) is interdisciplinary and broad. Several RF MEMS devices will be discussed in this course. These include resonators, silicon clock, RF ohmic switches, switched capacitor banks, tunable filters, variable capacitors, phase shifters, packaging, phased arrays, reconfigurable RF systems, antenna tuning, and more. The course outcome is that attendees acquire knowledge about the field of MEMS, the fundamentals of microfabrication, RF MEMS device operation principles and examples, and state-of the-art technology and challenges.


Introduction to Hardware Security: Trojans, Counterfeits, and Security in an Interconnected World

Instructor: Brian Dupaix, Adjunct Professor

Duration: Half-day

Date/Time: Friday, August 10  |  8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Recent hardware-enabled security attacks such as Spectre and Meltdown have highlighted the need for security principles to be addressed in the hardware domain. This course introduces participants to the plethora of research topics in the field of hardware security used to mitigate hardware-based security attacks. The intended audience includes security engineers, hardware designers, IC designers, and others interested in knowledge of security in the hardware domain.


Recent Developments in Spectroscopic Sensor Technology

Instructor: Christopher Ball, Research Scientist

Duration: Half-day

Date/Time: Friday, August 10  |  8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Researchers have investigated the science of spectroscopy in the laboratory for over a century. In recent years, the development of enabling technologies, such as smaller, more powerful sources, highly sensitive detectors, novel analysis algorithms, and high-speed processors, has enabled the xevelopment of a broad range of sensor technologies based on spectroscopy techniques. This course will provide an overview of spectroscopy phenomenology from microwave through ultraviolet, summarize recent developments of components and systems, and discuss several applications in pollution monitoring, agriculture, and defense applications.


Standard Pedestrian and Bicyclist Targets Development for Vehicular Pre-collision mm-Wave Radar Systems

Instructor: Chi-Chih Chen, Research Associate Professor

Duration: Half-day

Date/Time: Friday, August 10  |  1:30 PM - 5:00 PM

The growing number of new cars are equipped with mm-wave radars for automatic emergency braking systems in detecting pedestrians, bicyclist, and other object on road. However, there is lack of international testing standards and procedures for assessing the reliability of the these radar systems. The key components are accurate and reliable standard test targets which produce radar response similar to real pedestrian and bicyclist. This talk discusses articulated pedestrian and a bicyclist targets that were successfully developed by the lecturer’s research group in collaboration with Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis.


Cube Sats: Revolutionizing Access to Space-Based Research

Instructor: Christopher Ball, Research Scientist

Duration: Half-day

Date/Time: Friday, August 10  |  1:30 PM - 5:00 PM

In recent years, the proliferation of small satellites known as “cube sats” has introduced a new paradigm for access to space for research purposes. This course will examine the underlying technology of cube sats and provide examples of how they are used. In addition, the process of developing, testing, launching, and operating a cube sat will be described, drawing upon recent cube sat missions. Unique aspects of cube sat systems, such as size/power constraints, mission duration, payloads, and constellations will be discussed, along with a view toward the future of cube sat technology and missions.