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Trusted Microelectronics

Can we trust state-of-the-art microelectronic components and systems manufactured in untrusted conditions? The answer is no! There have been several vulnerabilities identified in the IC supply chain including off-shore sources, counterfeit parts and IP theft.

T
he Department of Defense, Department of Homeland Security, industry and others have recognized the security risk of untrusted electronic components in the supply chain and have put in place cyber strategies and policies that require methods to establish trust in components used in critical systems. ESL has recently established a trusted microelectronics portfolio to develop advances in technology which may benefit supply chain risk management.

A partnership between ESL and industry has been established to allow for strategic research collaboration in the field of trustworthy integrated circuits and systems. The successful research is a result of:
 
  • Interdisciplinary program involving digital, analog and RF integrated circuits and FPGAs addressing lifetime reliability, authentication, and trustworthiness.
  • State of the art infrastructure including CAD tools, wafer/package test facilities, and access to in house and external foundries.
  • Timely, relevant education and student training programs are on the horizon. 
Current and future research topics include:
  • Design for reliability techniques at advanced semiconductor nodes
  • Design for security techniques 
  • Malicious circuit detection
  • Physically uncloneable functions 
  • Side channel analysis
  • Electromagnetic signatures and analysis